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The Rescue of the Tin Woodman (спасение железного дровосека)




 

When Dorothy awoke (проснулась; to awake) the sun was shining through the trees (солнце светило сквозь деревья) and Toto had long been out chasing birds around him and squirrels (давно уже гонял птиц вокруг себя и белок).

She sat up (села) and looked around her (посмотрела вокруг себя). Scarecrow, still standing patiently in his corner (все /еще/ до сих пор/ стоящий терпеливо, упорно в своем углу), waiting for her (ждущий ее).

"We must go (идти) and search for water (поискать воду)," she said to him (сказала ему).

"Why do you want water?" he asked (спросил).

"To wash my face clean (чтобы помыть свое лицо чисто) after the dust of the road (после пыли дороги = дорожной пыли), and to drink (попить), so the dry bread will not stick in my throat (так /чтобы/ сухой хлеб не застрял в моем горле)."

"It must be inconvenient (неудобно) to be made of flesh (быть сделанным из плоти)," said the Scarecrow thoughtfully (задумчиво), "for you must sleep (должна спать), and eat and drink. However (как бы то ни было), you have brains, and it is worth a lot of bother (стоит многих хлопот, стоит беспокойства /доставляемого плотью/) to be able to think properly (быть способным мыслить как следует, должным образом)." They left the cottage (покинули домик) and walked through the trees until they found a little spring of clear water (пока не нашли маленький источник чистой воды), where Dorothy drank and bathed (искупалась) and ate her breakfast (съела свой завтрак). She saw there was not much bread left in the basket (в корзине), and the girl was thankful (благодарна) the Scarecrow did not have to eat anything, for there was scarcely enough for herself (так /как/ там было едва достаточно для нее = едва хватало ей) and Toto for the day (на день).

When she had finished her meal (закончила свою еду: «свой прием пиши»), and was about to go back (собиралась возвращаться; to be about — собираться) to the road of yellow brick, she was startled to hear a deep groan near by (вздрогнула, услышав глубокий стон поблизости).

"What was that?" she asked timidly (робко).

"I cannot imagine (представить)," replied the Scarecrow; "but we can go and see." Just then another groan reached their ears (достиг их ушей), and the sound seemed (звук, казалось) to come from behind them. They turned (повернули) and walked through the forest a few steps (и прошли через лес несколько шагов), when Dorothy discovered something (обнаружила что-то) shining in a ray of sunshine (светящееся в луче солнечного света) that fell between the trees. She ran to the place (подбежала к месту) and then stopped short (быстро), with a little cry of surprise (с небольшим криком удивления).

One of the big trees had been partly chopped through (частично надрублено; to chop — рубить), and standing beside it (и стоя около него), with an uplifted axe in his hands (с поднятым топором в его руках), was a man made entirely of tin (сделанный полностью из железа). His head and arms and legs were jointed upon his body (сочленены на его теле = присоединены к его телу), but he stood perfectly motionless (совершенно неподвижно), as if he could not stir at all (двигаться совсем).

Dorothy looked at him in amazement (в изумлении), and so did the Scarecrow, while Toto barked sharply (лаял резко) and made a snap at the tin legs (сделал укус = укусил за оловянные ноги), which hurt his teeth (что причинило боль его зубам).

"Did you groan?" asked Dorothy.

"Yes," answered the tin man, "I did. I've been groaning for more than a year (больше, чем год = больше года), and no one has ever heard me before or come to help me (пришел помочь мне)."

"What can I do for you?" she inquired softly (спросила тихо, мягко), for she was moved by the sad voice (была растрогана грустным голосом) in which the man spoke (говорил).

"Get an oil-can (достаньте масленку) and oil my joints (смажь/маслом/ мои шарниры)," he answered. "They are rusted so badly (проржавели так сильно; to rust — ржаветь) that I cannot move them at all (двигать ими вовсе); if I am well oiled I shall soon be all right again (вскоре снова буду в порядке). You will find an oil-can on a shelf in my cottage (на полке в моем домике)." Dorothy at once ran back to the cottage and found the oil-can, and then she returned and asked anxiously (тревожно = с тревогой), "Where are your joints?"

"Oil my neck (шею), first (сначала)," replied the Tin Woodman. So she oiled it, and as it was quite badly rusted the Scarecrow took hold of the tin head (схватил железную голову) and moved it gently from side to side (покрутил ее осторожно, немного из стороны в сторону) until it worked freely (пока она не заработала свободно), and then the man could turn it himself.

"Now oil the joints in my arms," he said. And Dorothy oiled them and the Scarecrow bent them carefully (согнул их осторожно; to bend — наклонять) until they were quite free from rust and as good as new (как новые).

The Tin Woodman (дровосек) gave a sigh of satisfaction (издал вздох удовлетворения) and lowered his axe (опустил свой топор), which he leaned against the tree (прислонил к дереву).

"This is a great comfort (большое облегчение)," he said. "I have been holding that axe in the air (в воздухе) ever since I rusted (с тех пор как заржавел), and I'm glad to be able (я доволен, что могу) to put it down at last (опустить наконец). Now, if you will oil the joints of my legs, I shall be all right once more (еще больше)." So they oiled his legs until he could move them freely; and he thanked them again and again for his release (освобождение, избавление), for he seemed a very polite creature (казался = казалось, был очень вежливым созданием), and very grateful (очень признательным, благодарным).

 

squirrel [´skwır(ə)l] inconvenient [ınkən´vi:njənt] bother [´boðə] creature [´kri:t∫ə]

 

 

When Dorothy awoke the sun was shining through the trees and Toto had long been out chasing birds around him and squirrels.

She sat up and looked around her. Scarecrow, still standing patiently in his corner, waiting for her.

"We must go and search for water," she said to him.

"Why do you want water?" he asked.

"To wash my face clean after the dust of the road, and to drink, so the dry bread will not stick in my throat."

"It must be inconvenient to be made of flesh," said the Scarecrow thoughtfully, "for you must sleep, and eat and drink. However, you have brains, and it is worth a lot of bother to be able to think properly." They left the cottage and walked through the trees until they found a little spring of clear water, where Dorothy drank and bathed and ate her breakfast. She saw there was not much bread left in the basket, and the girl was thankful the Scarecrow did not have to eat anything, for there was scarcely enough for herself and Toto for the day.

When she had finished her meal, and was about to go back to the road of yellow brick, she was startled to hear a deep groan near by.

"What was that?" she asked timidly.

"I cannot imagine," replied the Scarecrow; "but we can go and see." Just then another groan reached their ears, and the sound seemed to come from behind them. They turned and walked through the forest a few steps, when Dorothy discovered something shining in a ray of sunshine that fell between the trees. She ran to the place and then stopped short, with a little cry of surprise.

One of the big trees had been partly chopped through, and standing beside it, with an uplifted axe in his hands, was a man made entirely of tin. His head and arms and legs were jointed upon his body, but he stood perfectly motionless, as if he could not stir at all.

Dorothy looked at him in amazement, and so did the Scarecrow, while Toto barked sharply and made a snap at the tin legs, which hurt his teeth.

"Did you groan?" asked Dorothy.

"Yes," answered the tin man, "I did. I've been groaning for more than a year, and no one has ever heard me before or come to help me."

"What can I do for you?" she inquired softly, for she was moved by the sad voice in which the man spoke.

"Get an oil-can and oil my joints," he answered. "They are rusted so badly that I cannot move them at all; if I am well oiled I shall soon be all right again. You will find an oil-can on a shelf in my cottage." Dorothy at once ran back to the cottage and found the oil-can, and then she returned and asked anxiously, "Where are your joints?"

"Oil my neck, first," replied the Tin Woodman. So she oiled it, and as it was quite badly rusted the Scarecrow took hold of the tin head and moved it gently from side to side until it worked freely, and then the man could turn it himself.

"Now oil the joints in my arms," he said. And Dorothy oiled them and the Scarecrow bent them carefully until they were quite free from rust and as good as new.

The Tin Woodman gave a sigh of satisfaction and lowered his axe, which he leaned against the tree.

"This is a great comfort," he said. "I have been holding that axe in the air ever since I rusted, and I'm glad to be able to put it down at last. Now, if you will oil the joints of my legs, I shall be all right once more." So they oiled his legs until he could move them freely; and he thanked them again and again for his release, for he seemed a very polite creature, and very grateful.

 

"I might have stood there always (мог бы стоять там всегда) if you had not come along (если бы вы не пришли)," he said (сказал); "so you have certainly saved my life (конечно /же/, спасли мою жизнь). How did you happen to be here (оказались здесь)?"

"We are on our way (на нашем пути) to the Emerald City to see the Great Oz," she answered, "and we stopped at your cottage to pass the night (провести ночь)."

"Why do you wish (желаете) to see Oz?" he asked.

"I want him to send me back to Kansas, and the Scarecrow wants him to put a few brains into his head (вложить немного мозгов в его голову)," she replied (ответила).

The Tin Woodman appeared (показался; to appear — показаться) to think deeply for a moment (думает глубоко = усиленно на мгновение). Then he said: "Do you suppose (полагаете) Oz could give me a heart (может дать мне сердце)?"

"Why, I guess so (я предполагаю так = думаю, да)," Dorothy answered. "It would be as easy as (это будет так же легко, как) to give the Scarecrow brains."

"True (правда)," the Tin Woodman returned (ответил). "So, if you will allow me (позволите мне; to allow — позволять) to join your party (присоединиться к вашей компании), I will also go to the Emerald City and ask Oz to help me (помочь мне)."

"Come along (идите с нами)," said the Scarecrow heartily (искренне), and Dorothy added (добавила) that she would be pleased to have his company (будет польщена иметь его общество). So the Tin Woodman shouldered his axe (взвалил на плечо свой топор) and they all passed through the forest until they came to the road that was paved with yellow brick (к дороге, которая была выложена желтым кирпичом).

The Tin Woodman had asked Dorothy to put the oil-can in her basket (в ее корзину).

"For (ибо)," he said, "if I should get caught in the rain (буду пойман под дождем = попаду под дождь; to catch — ловить), and rust again (и заржавею снова), I would need the oil-can badly (буду нуждаться /в/ масленке сильно; to need — нуждаться)." It was a bit of good luck («небольшой кусочек» хорошего везения) to have their new comrade join the party, for soon after they had begun their journey again (начали свое путешествие снова) they came to a place where the trees and branches grew so thick over the road (где деревья и ветки росли так густо над дорогой) that the travellers could not pass (что путешественники не могли пройти). But the Tin Woodman set to work with his axe (принялся работать топором) and chopped so well that soon he cleared a passage for the entire party (расчистил проход для целой группы; to clear — чистить).

Dorothy was thinking so earnestly (думала так серьезно = настолько погрузилась в размышления) as they walked along that she did not notice (заметила) when the Scarecrow stumbled into a hole (споткнулся о яму) and rolled over (скатился) to the side of the road. Indeed he was obliged to call to her (в самом деле, он был обязан позвать ее) to help him up again (чтобы снова поднять его).

"Why didn't you walk around the hole?" asked the Tin Woodman.

"I don't know enough (у меня нет достаточных знаний)," replied the Scarecrow cheerfully (весело).

"My head is stuffed with straw (набита соломой), you know, and that is why I am going to Oz to ask him for some brains."

"Oh, I see," said the Tin Woodman. "But, after all (в конце концов: «после всего»), brains are not the best things in the world."

"Have you any?" inquired the Scarecrow.

"No, my head is quite empty (довольно пустая)," answered the Woodman.

"But once I had brains (но раньше у меня были мозги), and a heart also (и сердце тоже); so, having tried them both (испробовав и то, и другое: «обе вещи»), I should much rather have a heart (я бы скорее предпочел иметь сердце)."

"And why is that?" asked the Scarecrow.

"I will tell you my story, and then you will know." So, while they were walking through the forest, the Tin Woodman told the following story (следующую историю): "I was born the son of a woodman (был рожден сыном лесника) who chopped down trees in the forest and sold the wood for a living (продавал древесину для проживания = для пропитания; to sell — продавать). When I grew up (вырос; to grow up — вырастать), I too became a woodchopper, and after my father died (мой отец умер) I took care of my old mother (я взял заботу о своей старой маме; to take care — заботиться) as long as she lived (пока жила = была жива). Then I made up my mind (решил; to make up one’s mind — решить, принять решение) that instead of living alone (вместо /того, чтобы/ жить одному) I would marry (женюсь), so that I might not become lonely (чтобы не стать одиноким).

"There was one of the Munchkin girls who was so beautiful (такой красивой) that I soon grew to love her with all my heart (начал любить ее всем своим сердцем). She, on her part (со своей стороны), promised (пообещала) to marry me as soon as I could earn enough money (как только я смогу зарабатывать достаточно денег) to build a better house for her (чтобы построить получше дом для нее); so I set to work harder than ever (так что я принялся работать тяжелее = больше, чем когда-либо).

But the girl lived with an old woman (со старой женщиной) who did not want her to marry anyone, for she was so lazy (ленивой) she wished the girl to remain with her and do the cooking and the housework (желала девушку оставить с ней и = чтобы готовить и делать работу по дому). So the old woman went to the Wicked Witch of the East, and promised her two sheep (овцы) and a cow (корову) if she would prevent the marriage (предотвратит свадьбу). Thereupon (вслед за этим) the Wicked Witch enchanted my axe (околдовала мой топор), and when I was chopping away at my best one day (изо всех /сил/ /в/ один день), for I was anxious (так как я очень желал; to be anxious — сильно желать) to get the new house and my wife as soon as possible (как можно скорее), the axe slipped all at once (выскользнул неожиданно) and cut off my left leg (отрезал мою левую ногу).

"This at first (сначала) seemed a great misfortune (казалось большим невезением), for I knew a one-legged man (одноногий мужчина) could not do very well (не мог хорошо работать) as a wood-chopper (в качестве дровосека). So I went to a tinsmith (жестянщику) and had him make me a new leg out of tin. The leg worked very well (работала очень хорошо), once I was used to it (привык к ней; to be used to smth — привыкать к чему-либо). But my action angered (но мой поступок разозлил) the Wicked Witch of the East, for she had promised the old woman I should not marry the pretty Munchkin girl. When I began chopping again, my axe slipped and cut off my right leg (правую ногу). Again I went to the tinsmith, and again he made me a leg out of tin.

 

appear [ə´pıə] guess [ges] earn [ə:n] comrade [´komrıd]

 

 

"I might have stood there always if you had not come along," he said; "so you have certainly saved my life. How did you happen to be here?"

"We are on our way to the Emerald City to see the Great Oz," she answered, "and we stopped at your cottage to pass the night."

"Why do you wish to see Oz?" he asked.

"I want him to send me back to Kansas, and the Scarecrow wants him to put a few brains into his head," she replied.

The Tin Woodman appeared to think deeply for a moment. Then he said: "Do you suppose Oz could give me a heart?"

"Why, I guess so," Dorothy answered. "It would be as easy as to give the Scarecrow brains."

"True," the Tin Woodman returned. "So, if you will allow me to join your party, I will also go to the Emerald City and ask Oz to help me."

"Come along," said the Scarecrow heartily, and Dorothy added that she would be pleased to have his company. So the Tin Woodman shouldered his axe and they all passed through the forest until they came to the road that was paved with yellow brick.

The Tin Woodman had asked Dorothy to put the oil-can in her basket.

"For," he said, "if I should get caught in the rain, and rust again, I would need the oil-can badly." It was a bit of good luck to have their new comrade join the party, for soon after they had begun their journey again they came to a place where the trees and branches grew so thick over the road that the travelers could not pass. But the Tin Woodman set to work with his axe and chopped so well that soon he cleared a passage for the entire party.

Dorothy was thinking so earnestly as they walked along that she did not notice when the Scarecrow stumbled into a hole and rolled over to the side of the road. Indeed he was obliged to call to her to help him up again.

"Why didn't you walk around the hole?" asked the Tin Woodman.

"I don't know enough," replied the Scarecrow cheerfully.

"My head is stuffed with straw, you know, and that is why I am going to Oz to ask him for some brains."

"Oh, I see," said the Tin Woodman. "But, after all, brains are not the best things in the world."

"Have you any?" inquired the Scarecrow.

"No, my head is quite empty," answered the Woodman.

"But once I had brains, and a heart also; so, having tried them both, I should much rather have a heart."

"And why is that?" asked the Scarecrow.

"I will tell you my story, and then you will know." So, while they were walking through the forest, the Tin Woodman told the following story: "I was born the son of a woodman who chopped down trees in the forest and sold the wood for a living. When I grew up, I too became a woodchopper, and after my father died I took care of my old mother as long as she lived. Then I made up my mind that instead of living alone I would marry, so that I might not become lonely.

"There was one of the Munchkin girls who was so beautiful that I soon grew to love her with all my heart. She, on her part, promised to marry me as soon as I could earn enough money to build a better house for her; so I set to work harder than ever.

But the girl lived with an old woman who did not want her to marry anyone, for she was so lazy she wished the girl to remain with her and do the cooking and the housework. So the old woman went to the Wicked Witch of the East, and promised her two sheep and a cow if she would prevent the marriage. Thereupon the Wicked Witch enchanted my axe, and when I was chopping away at my best one day, for I was anxious to get the new house and my wife as soon as possible, the axe slipped all at once and cut off my left leg.

"This at first seemed a great misfortune, for I knew a one-legged man could not do very well as a wood-chopper. So I went to a tinsmith and had him make me a new leg out of tin. The leg worked very well, once I was used to it. But my action angered the Wicked Witch of the East, for she had promised the old woman I should not marry the pretty Munchkin girl. When I began chopping again, my axe slipped and cut off my right leg. Again I went to the tinsmith, and again he made me a leg out of tin.

 

After this the enchanted axe cut off my arms (после этого заколдованный топор отрезал мои руки), one after the other (одну за другой); but, nothing daunted (вовсе не устрашенный) I had them replaced with tin ones (я попросил, чтобы их заменили железными /руками/).

The Wicked Witch then made the axe slip (заставила мой топор выскользнуть) and cut off my head (мою голову), and at first I thought (подумал) that was the end of me (это был конец меня = настал мой конец). But the tinsmith happened to come along (но жестянщик случился проходить мимо = как раз шел мимо), and he made me a new head out of tin.

"I thought I had beaten (победил) the Wicked Witch then, and I worked harder than ever; but I little knew how cruel my enemy could be (я мало подозревал, каким жестоким мой враг может быть).

She thought of a new way (придумала новый способ) to kill my love for the beautiful Munchkin maiden (дева), and made my axe slip again, so that it cut right through my body (через = сквозь мое тело), splitting me into two halves (разделив меня на две половинки; to split — разделять). Once more (еще раз) the tinsmith came to my help (пришел мне на помощь) and made me a body of tin, fastening my tin arms and legs and head to it (прикрепив мои железные руки и ноги, и голову к нему), by means of joints (с помощью шарниров), so that I could move around (двигаться вокруг) as well as ever (так же хорошо, как всегда, как обычно). But, alas (но, увы)! I had now no heart, so that I lost (потерял; to loose) all my love for the Munchkin girl, and did not care (и не беспокоился) whether I married her or not. I suppose (полагаю) she is still living with the old woman, waiting for me (ожидая меня; to wait for — ждать) to come after her (что я прийду за ней).

"My body shone so brightly in the sun (сверкало так ярко на солнце; to shine) that I felt very proud of it (я почувствовал /себя/ очень гордым за него) and it did not matter now (не имело значения теперь) if my axe slipped, for it could not cut me. There was only one danger (опасность) — that my joints would rust; but I kept an oil-can in my cottage and took care to oil myself whenever I needed it (всякий раз, когда нуждался в этом). However, there came a day when I forgot to do this (забыл; to forget), and, being caught in a rainstorm (будучи пойманным в ливень = попав под ливень), before I thought of the danger my joints had rusted, and I was left to stand in the woods until you came to help me. It was a terrible thing to undergo (ужасная вещь, /чтобы/ испытать = которую мне пришлось испытать; to undergo — испытывать), but during the year I stood there (в течение года я стоял там) I had time to think that the greatest loss (наибольшая потеря) I had known was the loss of my heart.

While I was in love (был влюблен) I was the happiest man on earth (на земле); but no one can love who has not a heart, and so I am resolved (решился) to ask Oz to give me one. If he does, I will go back to the Munchkin maiden and marry her." Both Dorothy and the Scarecrow had been greatly interested in the story of the Tin Woodman (сильно заинтересовались историей Железного Дровосека), and now they knew why he was so anxious to get a new heart.

"All the same (все равно)," said the Scarecrow, "I shall ask for brains instead of a heart; for a fool would not know (глупец не будет знать) what to do with a heart if he had one (если бы оно у него и было)."

"I shall take the heart," returned (ответил) the Tin Woodman; "for brains do not make one happy (счастливым), and happiness (и счастье) is the best thing in the world (самая лучшая вещь в мире)." Dorothy did not say anything, for she was puzzled (так как она была озадачена) to know which of her two friends was right (был прав), and she decided (решила) if she could only get back to Kansas and Aunt Em, it did not matter so much (не значило так много = не имело значения) whether the Woodman had no brains and the Scarecrow no heart, or each got what he wanted (или каждый получил бы, что хотел).

What worried her most (что беспокоило ее больше /всего/) was that the bread was nearly gone (почти ушел = закончился), and another meal (прием пищи) for herself and Toto would empty the basket (опустошит корзину). To be sure neither the Woodman nor the Scarecrow (ни Дровосек, ни Страшила) ever ate anything, but she was not made of tin nor straw (не была сделана /ни/ из железа, ни из соломы), and could not live unless she was fed (пока она /не/ была накормлена; to feed — кормить).

 

misfortune [mıs´fo:t∫(ə)n] enemy [´enemı] maiden [´meıdn]

 

 

After this the enchanted axe cut off my arms, one after the other; but, nothing daunted, I had them replaced with tin ones.

The Wicked Witch then made the axe slip and cut off my head, and at first I thought that was the end of me. But the tinsmith happened to come along, and he made me a new head out of tin.

"I thought I had beaten the Wicked Witch then, and I worked harder than ever; but I little knew how cruel my enemy could be.

She thought of a new way to kill my love for the beautiful Munchkin maiden, and made my axe slip again, so that it cut right through my body, splitting me into two halves. Once more the tinsmith came to my help and made me a body of tin, fastening my tin arms and legs and head to it, by means of joints, so that I could move around as well as ever. But, alas!I had now no heart, so that I lost all my love for the Munchkin girl, and did not care whether I married her or not. I suppose she is still living with the old woman, waiting for me to come after her.

"My body shone so brightly in the sun that I felt very proud of it and it did not matter now if my axe slipped, for it could not cut me. There was only one danger — that my joints would rust; but I kept an oil-can in my cottage and took care to oil myself whenever I needed it. However, there came a day when I forgot to do this, and, being caught in a rainstorm, before I thought of the danger my joints had rusted, and I was left to stand in the woods until you came to help me. It was a terrible thing to undergo, but during the year I stood there I had time to think that the greatest loss I had known was the loss of my heart.

While I was in love I was the happiest man on earth; but no one can love who has not a heart, and so I am resolved to ask Oz to give me one. If he does, I will go back to the Munchkin maiden and marry her." Both Dorothy and the Scarecrow had been greatly interested in the story of the Tin Woodman, and now they knew why he was so anxious to get a new heart.

"All the same," said the Scarecrow, "I shall ask for brains instead of a heart; for a fool would not know what to do with a heart if he had one."

"I shall take the heart," returned the Tin Woodman; "for brains do not make one happy, and happiness is the best thing in the world." Dorothy did not say anything, for she was puzzled to know which of her two friends was right, and she decided if she could only get back to Kansas and Aunt Em, it did not matter so much whether the Woodman had no brains and the Scarecrow no heart, or each got what he wanted.

What worried her most was that the bread was nearly gone, and another meal for herself and Toto would empty the basket. To be sure neither the Woodman nor the Scarecrow ever ate anything, but she was not made of tin nor straw, and could not live unless she was fed.

 





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