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How Dorothy Saved (спасла) the Scarecrow




 

When Dorothy was left alone (оставлена одна) she began to feel hungry (начала чувствовать голод). So she went to the cupboard (пошла к буфету) and cut herself some bread (отрезала себе хлеба), which she spread with butter (/на/который она намазала масло). She gave some to Toto (дала сколько-то: «некоторое количество, немного»), and taking a pail from the shelf (взяв ведро с полки) she carried it down to the little brook (к маленькому ручью) and filled it with clear, sparkling water (наполнила его чистой, искрящейся водой; to fill smth with — наполнять). Toto ran over to the trees (побежал к деревьям) and began to bark at the birds sitting there (начал лаять на птиц, сидевших там). Dorothy went to get him, and saw such delicious fruit (восхитительные фрукты) hanging from the branches (веток) that she gathered some of it (собрала), finding it (находя это) just what she wanted (как раз то, что она хотела) to help out her breakfast (помочь ей с завтраком = на завтрак).

Then she went back (пошла обратно) to the house, and having helped herself and Toto to a good drink (угостившись и угостив Тото напитком, питьем) of the cool, clear water (холодной, чистой: «ясной, прозрачной» воды), she set about (приступила) making ready for the journey to the City of Emeralds (готовиться к путешествию).

Dorothy had only one other dress, but that happened (случилось) to be clean and was hanging on a peg (на гвоздике) beside her bed. It was gingham (сарафан), with checks of white and blue (с полосками белого и голубого = в бело-голубую клетку); and although the blue was somewhat faded (слегка побледневшим) with many washings (от многочисленных стирок), it was still a pretty frock (милым платьицем). The girl washed herself carefully (тщательно), dressed herself in the clean gingham, and tied her pink sunbonnet (завязала свою розовую косынку) on her head. She took a little basket (корзинку) and filled it with bread from the cupboard (из буфета), laying a white cloth over the top (положив белую тряпочку наверх). Then she looked down at her feet and noticed (заметила) how old and worn (изношенными) her shoes were.

"They surely will never do for a long journey (они точно /не/ подойдут для длинного путешествия; to do for — подходить), Toto," she said.

And Toto looked up into her face with his little black eyes and wagged his tail (повилял хвостом) to show he knew what she meant (подразумевала).

At that moment Dorothy saw lying on the table the silver shoes that had belonged to (принадлежали; to belong to — принадлежать) the Witch of the East.

"I wonder if they will fit me (любопытно, подойдут ли они мне)," she said to Toto. "They would be just the thing to take a long walk in (для длительной ходьбы), for they could not wear out (износиться)." She took off her old leather shoes (сняла свои старые кожаные башмаки) and tried on (примерила) the silver ones, which fitted her as well as if (словно) they had been made for her.

Finally (в конечном счете) she picked up her basket (подхватила, подняла корзинку).

"Come along (пойдем), Toto," she said. "We will go to the Emerald City and ask (спросим) the Great Oz how to get back to Kansas again." She closed the door, locked it (закрыла; to lock — закрывать /на замок/), and put the key (положила ключ) carefully in the pocket of her dress (в карман платья). And so, with Toto trotting along (бегущего трусцой; to trot along — бежать трусцой) soberly behind her («рассудительно» = спокойно за ней), she started on her journey.

There were several roads near by (несколько дорог поблизости), but it did not take her long (не заняло много времени) to find the one paved with yellow bricks (одну, мощенную желтым кирпичом). Within (в /пределах/рамках/) a short time she was walking briskly (шла живо) toward the Emerald City, her silver shoes tinkling merrily (звенели весело) on the hard, yellow road-bed. The sun shone bright (светило ярко) and the birds sang sweetly (пели сладко, очаровательно), and Dorothy did not feel nearly so bad (не чувствовала /и/ близко так плохо) as you might think (как вы можете подумать) a little girl would who had been suddenly whisked away (была внезапно сметена) from her own country and set down in the midst of a strange land (высажена посреди чужой страны).

She was surprised (удивлена), as she walked along, to see how pretty the country was about her. There were neat fences (аккуратные заборы) at the sides of the road, painted a dainty blue color (окрашенные /в/ изысканный голубой цвет), and beyond them (за ними) were fields of grain and vegetables (поля злаков и овощей) in abundance (в изобилии). Evidently (очевидно) the Munchkins were good farmers and able to raise large crops (способны выращивать большие урожаи). Once in a while she would pass a house (проходила мимо дома), and the people came out to look at her and bow low (кланялись низко) as she went by (когда она проходила мимо); for everyone knew she had been the means of destroying (средством уничтожения; to destroy — уничтожать, разрушать) the Wicked Witch and setting them free from bondage (освобождения их от неволи).

The houses of the Munchkins were odd-looking dwellings (странно выглядящими жилищами), for each was round (ибо каждое было круглым), with a big dome for a roof (с большим куполом в качестве крыши). All were painted blue, for in this country of the East blue was the favorite color (любимым цветом).

Toward evening (к вечеру), when Dorothy was tired (устала; to be tired — быть уставшим) with her long walk and began to wonder (начала задаваться вопросом) where she should pass the night (провести ночь), she came to a house rather larger than the rest (который был несколько больше, чем остальные). On the green lawn before it (на зеленой лужайке перед ним) many men and women were dancing (танцевали). Five little fiddlers (скрипачей) played as loudly as possible (так громко, как это /было/ возможно), and the people were laughing and singing, while a big table near by was loaded (завален; to load — заваливать, загружать) with delicious fruits and nuts (вкусными плодами и орехами), pies and cakes (пирогами и печеньем), and many other good things to eat.

The people greeted (поприветствовали) Dorothy kindly, and invited (пригласили; to invite — приглашать) her to supper (поужинать) and to pass the night with them; for this was the home of one of the richest Munchkins in the land (одного из самых богатых), and his friends were gathered with him (собрались у него: «с») to celebrate their freedom (отпраздновать свое освобождение) from the bondage of the Wicked Witch.

 

leather [´leðə] dwelling [´dwelıŋ] vegetable [´veʤıtəbl]

 

 

When Dorothy was left alone she began to feel hungry. So she went to the cupboard and cut herself some bread, which she spread with butter. She gave some to Toto, and taking a pail from the shelf she carried it down to the little brook and filled it with clear, sparkling water. Toto ran over to the trees and began to bark at the birds sitting there. Dorothy went to get him, and saw such delicious fruit hanging from the branches that she gathered some of it, finding it just what she wanted to help out her breakfast.

Then she went back to the house, and having helped herself and Toto to a good drink of the cool, clear water, she set about making ready for the journey to the City of Emeralds.

Dorothy had only one other dress, but that happened to be clean and was hanging on a peg beside her bed. It was gingham, with checks of white and blue; and although the blue was somewhat faded with many washings, it was still a pretty frock. The girl washed herself carefully, dressed herself in the clean gingham, and tied her pink sunbonnet on her head. She took a little basket and filled it with bread from the cupboard, laying a white cloth over the top. Then she looked down at her feet and noticed how old and worn her shoes were.

"They surely will never do for a long journey, Toto," she said.

And Toto looked up into her face with his little black eyes and wagged his tail to show he knew what she meant.

At that moment Dorothy saw lying on the table the silver shoes that had belonged to the Witch of the East.

"I wonder if they will fit me," she said to Toto. "They would be just the thing to take a long walk in, for they could not wear out." She took off her old leather shoes and tried on the silver ones, which fitted her as well as if they had been made for her.

Finally she picked up her basket.

"Come along, Toto," she said. "We will go to the Emerald City and ask the Great Oz how to get back to Kansas again." She closed the door, locked it, and put the key carefully in the pocket of her dress. And so, with Toto trotting along soberly behind her, she started on her journey.

There were several roads near by, but it did not take her long to find the one paved with yellow bricks. Within a short time she was walking briskly toward the Emerald City, her silver shoes tinkling merrily on the hard, yellow road-bed. The sun shone bright and the birds sang sweetly, and Dorothy did not feel nearly so bad as you might think a little girl would who had been suddenly whisked away from her own country and set down in the midst of a strange land.

She was surprised, as she walked along, to see how pretty the country was about her. There were neat fences at the sides of the road, painted a dainty blue color, and beyond them were fields of grain and vegetables in abundance. Evidently the Munchkins were good farmers and able to raise large crops. Once in a while she would pass a house, and the people came out to look at her and bow low as she went by; for everyone knew she had been the means of destroying the Wicked Witch and setting them free from bondage.

The houses of the Munchkins were odd-looking dwellings, for each was round, with a big dome for a roof. All were painted blue, for in this country of the East blue was the favorite color.

Toward evening, when Dorothy was tired with her long walk and began to wonder where she should pass the night, she came to a house rather larger than the rest. On the green lawn before it many men and women were dancing. Five little fiddlers played as loudly as possible, and the people were laughing and singing, while a big table near by was loaded with delicious fruits and nuts, pies and cakes, and many other good things to eat.

The people greeted Dorothy kindly, and invited her to supper and to pass the night with them; for this was the home of one of the richest Munchkins in the land, and his friends were gathered with him to celebrate their freedom from the bondage of the Wicked Witch.

 

Dorothy ate a hearty supper (обильный ужин) and was waited upon by the rich Munchkin himself (и ей прислуживал сам …), whose name was Boq (которого звали …). Then she sat upon a settee (на диванчик) and watched the people dance (наблюдала людей танцующими).

When Boq saw her silver shoes he said, "You must be a great sorceress (ты, должно быть, великая ведьма)."

"Why?" asked the girl.

"Because you wear silver shoes (носишь серебряные) and have killed the Wicked Witch (убила).

Besides (кроме того), you have white in your frock (платье), and only witches and sorceresses wear white."

"My dress is blue and white checked," said Dorothy, smoothing out the wrinkles in it (разглаживая складки на нем).

"It is kind of you to wear that (мило с твоей стороны)," said Boq. "Blue is the color of the Munchkins, and white is the witch color. So we know (знаем) you are a friendly witch." Dorothy did not know what to say to this, for all the people seemed to think her a witch (думали /что/ она волшебница), and she knew very well (очень хорошо) she was only an ordinary little girl (обычная маленькая девочка) who had come by the chance of a cyclone (по случаю урагана) into a strange land.

When she had tired watching the dancing (когда устала смотреть на танцы), Boq led her into the house (ввел ее в дом; to lead — вести), where he gave her a room with a pretty bed in it.

The sheets (простыни) were made of blue cloth (из голубой ткани), and Dorothy slept soundly in them till morning (проспала в них крепко до утра), with Toto curled up (свернувшимся) on the blue rug beside her (на голубом коврике возле нее).

She ate a hearty breakfast, and watched a wee Munchkin baby (крошечного ребенка; wee — крошечный, маленький), who played with Toto and pulled his tail (тянул) and crowed (шумно радовался) and laughed in a way that greatly amused Dorothy (сильно позабавил). Toto was a fine curiosity (отличная диковина) to all the people, for they had never seen a dog before (до этого /ранее, прежде/).

"How far is it to the Emerald City?" the girl asked.

"I do not know," answered Boq gravely (серьезно), "for I have never been there. It is better for people to keep away from Oz (держаться подальше, избегать), unless they have business with him (если у них там только нет /особого/ дела). But it is a long way to the Emerald City, and it will take you many days (займет у тебя много дней). The country here is rich and pleasant (область, страна здесь = эта богатая и приятная), but you must pass through rough and dangerous places (через дикие и опасные места) before you reach the end of your journey (прежде чем достигнешь конца путешествия)." This worried (обеспокоило, встревожило) Dorothy a little, but she knew that only the Great Oz could help her get to Kansas again, so she bravely resolved (смело решила) not to turn back (не поворачивать назад).

She bade her friends good-bye (пожелала друзьям всего хорошего; to bid good-bye — желать всего хорошего), and again started along the road of yellow brick (по дороге из желтых кирпичей). When she had gone several miles (несколько миль) she thought she would stop to rest (остановится отдохнуть), and so climbed to the top of the fence (взобралась на верх забора; top — верхняя часть) beside the road and sat down. There was a great cornfield (кукурузное поле) beyond the fence (за оградой), and not far away she saw a Scarecrow (Пугало = Страшилу) placed high on a pole (помещенное высоко на шесте) to keep the birds from the ripe corn (спелой кукурузы).

Dorothy leaned her chin (оперлась подбородком) upon her hand and gazed thoughtfully (уставилась задумчиво) at the Scarecrow. Its head (голова) was a small sack stuffed with straw (мешком, набитым соломой), with eyes, nose, and mouth painted on it (нарисованными на нем) to represent a face (показать лицо).

On the feet (на ногах) were some old boots with blue tops (старые ботинка с синим верхом), such as every man wore in this country, and the figure was raised above the stalks of corn (поднята над стеблями) by means of the pole stuck up its back (посредством шеста, воткнутого вдоль его спины; to stick — втыкать).

While Dorothy was looking earnestly (серьезно) into the queer (чудное), painted face of the Scarecrow, she was surprised (удивлена) to see one of the eyes slowly wink at her (медленно подмигивающим ей; to wink at smb. — подмигивать кому-либо). She thought she must have been mistaken at first (должно быть, ошиблась), for none of the scarecrows (никто из пугал) in Kansas ever wink (когда-либо подмигивает = никогда не подмигивает); but presently (сейчас) the figure nodded its head to her (кивало своей головой к ней = обращаясь к ней) in a friendly way (дружелюбно). Then she climbed down from the fence (слезла) and walked up to it (подошла к нему), while Toto ran around the pole and barked (лаял).

"Good day," said the Scarecrow, in a rather husky voice (довольно охрипшим голосом).

"Did you speak?" asked the girl, in wonder (в изумлении).

"Certainly (конечно)," answered the Scarecrow. "How do you do? (как поживаешь /говорится при знакомстве/)"

 

scarecrow [´skεəkrəu] business [´bıznıs] curiosity [kjurı´osıtı]

 

 

Dorothy ate a hearty supper and was waited upon by the rich Munchkin himself, whose name was Boq. Then she sat upon a settee and watched the people dance.

When Boq saw her silver shoes he said, "You must be a great sorceress."

"Why?" asked the girl.

"Because you wear silver shoes and have killed the Wicked Witch.

Besides, you have white in your frock, and only witches and sorceresses wear white."

"My dress is blue and white checked," said Dorothy, smoothing out the wrinkles in it.

"It is kind of you to wear that," said Boq. "Blue is the color of the Munchkins, and white is the witch color. So we know you are a friendly witch." Dorothy did not know what to say to this, for all the people seemed to think her a witch, and she knew very well she was only an ordinary little girl who had come by the chance of a cyclone into a strange land.

When she had tired watching the dancing, Boq led her into the house, where he gave her a room with a pretty bed in it.

The sheets were made of blue cloth, and Dorothy slept soundly in them till morning, with Toto curled up on the blue rug beside her.

She ate a hearty breakfast, and watched a wee Munchkin baby, who played with Toto and pulled his tail and crowed and laughed in a way that greatly amused Dorothy. Toto was a fine curiosity to all the people, for they had never seen a dog before.

"How far is it to the Emerald City?" the girl asked.

"I do not know," answered Boq gravely, "for I have never been there. It is better for people to keep away from Oz, unless they have business with him. But it is a long way to the Emerald City, and it will take you many days. The country here is rich and pleasant, but you must pass through rough and dangerous places before you reach the end of your journey." This worried Dorothy a little, but she knew that only the Great Oz could help her get to Kansas again, so she bravely resolved not to turn back.

She bade her friends good-bye, and again started along the road of yellow brick. When she had gone several miles she thought she would stop to rest, and so climbed to the top of the fence beside the road and sat down. There was a great cornfield beyond the fence, and not far away she saw a Scarecrow, placed high on a pole to keep the birds from the ripe corn.

Dorothy leaned her chin upon her hand and gazed thoughtfully at the Scarecrow. Its head was a small sack stuffed with straw, with eyes, nose, and mouth painted on it to represent a face.

An old, pointed blue hat, that had belonged to some Munchkin, was perched on his head, and the rest of the figure was a blue suit of clothes, worn and faded, which had also been stuffed with straw.

On the feet were some old boots with blue tops, such as every man wore in this country, and the figure was raised above the stalks of corn by means of the pole stuck up its back.

While Dorothy was looking earnestly into the queer, painted face of the Scarecrow, she was surprised to see one of the eyes slowly wink at her. She thought she must have been mistaken at first, for none of the scarecrows in Kansas ever wink; but presently the figure nodded its head to her in a friendly way. Then she climbed down from the fence and walked up to it, while Toto ran around the pole and barked.

"Good day," said the Scarecrow, in a rather husky voice.

"Did you speak?" asked the girl, in wonder.

"Certainly," answered the Scarecrow. "How do you do?"

 

"I'm pretty well (довольно хорошо), thank you," replied Dorothy politely (ответила Дороти вежливо).

"How do you do (как поживаете)?"

"I'm not feeling well (не чувствую /себя/ хорошо)," said the Scarecrow, with a smile (с улыбкой), "for it is very tedious (утомительно) being perched up here night and day (быть насаженным на шест здесь ночью и днем; perch — жердь, шест) to scare away crows (распугивать ворон)."

"Can't you get down (спуститься)?" asked Dorothy (спросила Дороти).

"No, for this pole is stuck up my back (эта палка воткнута вдоль моей спины). If you will please take away (уберете) the pole I shall be greatly obliged to you (сильно обязан; to oblige — обязывать)." Dorothy reached up both arms (вытянула вверх обе руки) and lifted the figure off the pole (подняла = сняла фигуру с шеста), for, being stuffed with straw (будучи набитым соломой), it was quite light (довольно легким).

"Thank you very much," said the Scarecrow, when he had been set down on the ground (опущен на землю). "I feel like a new man (чувствую себя /так, словно стал/ новым человеком)." Dorothy was puzzled at this (была озадачена этим), for it sounded queer (звучало странно) to hear a stuffed man speak (слышать набитого человека говорящим), and to see him bow (наклоняющимся) and walk along beside her (идущим около нее).

"Who are you?" asked the Scarecrow when he had stretched himself (потянулся сам) and yawned (зевнул). "And where are you going (идешь)?"

"My name is Dorothy," said the girl, "and I am going to the Emerald City, to ask the Great Oz to send me back to Kansas (послать меня обратно в Канзас)."

"Where is the Emerald City?" he inquired (спросил). "And who is Oz?"

"Why, don't you know? (как, ты не знаешь)" she returned (возразила), in surprise (в удивлении = удивленно).

"No, indeed (нет, на самом деле). I don't know anything. You see, I am stuffed, so I have no brains at all (нет мозгов вовсе)," he answered sadly (ответил грустно).

"Oh," said Dorothy, "I'm awfully sorry for you (ужасно сожалею)."

"Do you think," he asked, "if I go to the Emerald City with you, that Oz would give me some brains (даст мне мозги)?"

"I cannot tell (не могу сказать = не знаю)," she returned (ответила: «вернула /реплику/»), "but you may come with me, if you like (если хотите). If Oz will not give you any brains you will be no worse off than you are now (не хуже, чем сейчас = терять нечего)."

"That is true (правда)," said the Scarecrow. "You see," he continued confidentially (продолжил доверительно), "I don't mind my legs and arms and body being stuffed (я не возражаю, /чтобы/ мои ноги и руки, и тело были набиты; to mind — возражать), because I cannot get hurt (получить повреждение, испытать боль). If anyone treads on my toes (наступает на мои пальцы на ногах) or sticks a pin into me (втыкает в меня иголку), it doesn't matter (это не имеет значение), for I can't feel it.

But I do not want people (не хочу, /чтобы/ люди) to call me a fool (называли меня дураком), and if my head stays (останется) stuffed with straw instead of with brains (вместо…), as yours is, how am I ever to know anything?"

"I understand (понимаю) how you feel," said the little girl, who was truly sorry for him (действительно жалко его). "If you will come with me I'll ask Oz to do all he can for you."

"Thank you," he answered gratefully (благодарно).

They walked back to the road (к дороге). Dorothy helped him over the fence, and they started along the path of yellow brick for the Emerald City.

Toto did not like this addition to the party at first (не понравилось это прибавление к компании сначала).

He smelled around (обнюхал вокруг) the stuffed man as if he suspected (подозревал) there might be a nest of rats (выводок крыс) in the straw, and he often growled in an unfriendly way (часто рычал недружелюбным способом = недружелюбно) at the Scarecrow.

"Don't mind Toto (не обращайте внимания на Тото)," said Dorothy to her new friend.

"He never bites (не кусается)".

"Oh, I'm not afraid (не боюсь; to be afraid of smth — бояться чего-либо)," replied the Scarecrow. "He can't hurt the straw. Do let me carry that basket for you (позволь уж мне понести ту корзину для тебя; to do do smth — действительно делать что-либо). I shall not mind it, for I can't get tired. I'll tell you a secret," he continued, as he walked along. "There is only one thing in the world I am afraid of."

"What is that?" asked Dorothy; "the Munchkin farmer who made you?"

"No," answered the Scarecrow; "it's a lighted match (зажженная спичка = горящая спичка)."

 

suspect [sΛ´spekt] secret [´si:krıt] tedious [´ti:djəs]

 

 

"I'm pretty well, thank you," replied Dorothy politely.

"How do you do?"

"I'm not feeling well," said the Scarecrow, with a smile, "for it is very tedious being perched up here night and day to scare away crows."

"Can't you get down?" asked Dorothy.

"No, for this pole is stuck up my back. If you will please take away the pole I shall be greatly obliged to you." Dorothy reached up both arms and lifted the figure off the pole, for, being stuffed with straw, it was quite light.

"Thank you very much," said the Scarecrow, when he had been set down on the ground. "I feel like a new man." Dorothy was puzzled at this, for it sounded queer to hear a stuffed man speak, and to see him bow and walk along beside her.

"Who are you?" asked the Scarecrow when he had stretched himself and yawned. "And where are you going?"

"My name is Dorothy," said the girl, "and I am going to the Emerald City, to ask the Great Oz to send me back to Kansas."

"Where is the Emerald City?" he inquired. "And who is Oz?"

"Why, don't you know?" she returned, in surprise.

"No, indeed. I don't know anything. You see, I am stuffed, so I have no brains at all," he answered sadly.

"Oh," said Dorothy, "I'm awfully sorry for you."

"Do you think," he asked, "if I go to the Emerald City with you, that Oz would give me some brains?"

"I cannot tell," she returned, "but you may come with me, if you like. If Oz will not give you any brains you will be no worse off than you are now."

"That is true," said the Scarecrow. "You see," he continued confidentially, "I don't mind my legs and arms and body being stuffed, because I cannot get hurt. If anyone treads on my toes or sticks a pin into me, it doesn't matter, for I can't feel it.

But I do not want people to call me a fool, and if my head stays stuffed with straw instead of with brains, as yours is, how am I ever to know anything?"

"I understand how you feel," said the little girl, who was truly sorry for him. "If you will come with me I'll ask Oz to do all he can for you."

"Thank you," he answered gratefully.

They walked back to the road. Dorothy helped him over the fence, and they started along the path of yellow brick for the Emerald City.

Toto did not like this addition to the party at first.

He smelled around the stuffed man as if he suspected there might be a nest of rats in the straw, and he often growled in an unfriendly way at the Scarecrow.

"Don't mind Toto," said Dorothy to her new friend.

"He never bites."

"Oh, I'm not afraid," replied the Scarecrow. "He can't hurt the straw. Do let me carry that basket for you. I shall not mind it, for I can't get tired. I'll tell you a secret," he continued, as he walked along. "There is only one thing in the world I am afraid of."

"What is that?" asked Dorothy; "the Munchkin farmer who made you?"

"No," answered the Scarecrow; "it's a lighted match."

 





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